ROVER RUCKUS

ROCER RUCKUS

The Game


FROVER RUCKUS℠ presented by Qualcomm® Incorporated is played on a 12 ft. x 12 ft. (3.7m x 3.7m) square field with approximately 1 ft. (0.3 m) high walls and a soft foam mat floor. The object of the game is to attain a higher score than the opposing alliance by descending from the Lander, collecting Minerals from the Crater, sorting and scoring Minerals into the Cargo Hold of the Lander, performing Autonomous tasks, and navigating to specific parts of the Playing Field. The Scoring Elements for the game are 60 Silver Minerals and 90 Gold Minerals, and a team supplied Team Marker.

There are two alliances of two robots each – “red” and “blue”. There are two alliance-neutral Craters sit in opposite corners of the Playing Field and two Alliance-specific Depots are in the other corners. Unique navigation targets are placed in the center of each field wall. In front of each corner is a Mineral Sampling Field with 2 Silver Minerals and 1 Gold Mineral, randomly lined up. Field personnel will randomize the Minerals in the Sampling Field prior to the start of the Match. The remaining Minerals are divided approximately equally and placed in each Crater.

The Lander sits in the center of the field with Alliance-specific Landing Zones marked by red and blue tape surrounding it. Prior to the start of a match, robots may be Latched onto the Lander. Robots that cannot be Latched must start in the alliance’s Landing Zone under one of the Alliance’s Lander Support Bracket. Robots may also preload a Team Marker.

Matches have two distinct periods of play: a 30-second autonomous period followed by a two-minute driver-controlled period, the last 30 seconds of the driver-controlled period is called the end game which adds new scoring opportunities for robots to achieve.

Playing Field
IRST LEGO Leage 2017-2018 HYDRO DYNAMICSSM Map
Playing Field Zoom
IRST LEGO Leage 2017-2018 HYDRO DYNAMICSSM Map

Autonomous Period


During the autonomous period, robots operate using only pre-programmed instructions and sensor inputs. Alliances earn points by: Landing – robots lower themselves from the Lander onto the Playing Field; Sampling – robots identify the single Gold Mineral in each Sample Field; Claiming – Robots place the Team Marker in their corresponding Depot; and Parking – robots that end the autonomous period in a Crater earn points.


Driver-Controlled Period


During the driver-controlled period, alliances earn points by placing Minerals into their alliance’s Cargo Holds and Depot. Gold Minerals must be placed in the Gold Cargo Hold and Silver Minerals into the Silver Cargo Hold to score. Any Mineral in the Depot increases the Alliances score.


END Game


The final 30 seconds of the driver-controlled period is called the end game. In addition to the driver-controlled period tasks, Alliances earn points by Latching onto the Lander or by Parking In or Completely in any Crater.


Scoring


Autonomous Period Scoring
MISSIONS Points
Landing 30
Sampling 25
Claiming 15
Parking 10
Driver-Controlled Period Scoring
MISSIONS Points
Gold Mineral
in Gold Cargo Hold
5 / Mineral
Silver Mineral
in Silver Cargo Hold
5 / Mineral
Any Mineral
in Depot
5 / Mineral
Incorrect Mineral
in either Cargo Hold
0 / Mineral
End Game Scoring
MISSIONS Points
Robots Latched 50 / Robot
Robots Parked In Crater 20
Robots Parked Completely
In Crater
20

PENALTIES

Teams are evaluted by judges in 3 categories ・RobotGame・Robot Design・Core Values Furthermore, the teams are evaluated by referees in the category Robot Game.

FIRST® Tech Challenge?

ROCER RUCKUS

In FIRST® Tech Challenge, teams of up to 15 students explore the possibilities of STEM through designing, building, programming, and operating robots to compete in a game challenge in an alliance format. Students practice engineering principles while learning the value of team work, innovation, and 21st century skills. Participants are also eligible to apply for $80M+ in college scholarships.


What is FIRST® Tech Challenge?


FIRST® Tech Challenge is a student-centered program that focuses on giving students a unique and stimulating experience. Each year, teams engage in a new game where they design, build, test, and program autonomous and driver operated robots that must perform a series of tasks. To learn more about FIRST® Tech Challenge and other FIRST® Programs, visit www.firstinspires.org.

There are two alliances of two robots each – “red” and “blue”. There are two alliance-neutral Craters sit in opposite corners of the Playing Field and two Alliance-specific Depots are in the other corners. Unique navigation targets are placed in the center of each field wall. In front of each corner is a Mineral Sampling Field with 2 Silver Minerals and 1 Gold Mineral, randomly lined up. Field personnel will randomize the Minerals in the Sampling Field prior to the start of the Match. The remaining Minerals are divided approximately equally and placed in each Crater.


FIRST Core Values


We express the FIRST® philosophies of Gracious Professionalism® and Coopertition® through our Core Values:

• Discovery: We explore new skills and ideas.
• Innovation: We use creativity and persistence to solve problems.
• Impact: We apply what we learn to improve our world.
• Inclusion: We respect each other and embrace our differences.
• Teamwork: We are stronger when we work together.
• Fun: We enjoy and celebrate what we do!


Gracious Professionalism®


FIRST® uses this term to describe our programs’ intent and Gracious Professionalism® is not clearly defined for a reason. It has different meanings to everyone. Some possible meanings of Gracious Professionalism include:

• Gracious attitudes and behaviors are win-win.
• Gracious folks respect others and let that respect show in their actions.
• Gracious Professionals make valued contributions in a way that is pleasing to others and to themselves.

In the end, Gracious Professionalism® is part of everyday life. When professionals use their knowledge graciously and individuals act with integrity and sensitivity, everyone wins, and society benefits.Watch Dr. Woodie Flowers explain Gracious Professionalism in this short video.

Gracious Professionalism for Volunteers

It is a good idea to spend time going over this concept with volunteers. Provide volunteers with real-life examples of Gracious Professionalism in practice before, during, and after the event and recognize great Gracious Professionalism when you see it in action!